Faith Amour Hair Care

Archive for the ‘Cleanse’ Category


THESE SHAMPOOS ARE IDEAL FOR CURLY HAIR. I CHECKED OUT EASYCURLS.COM AND THEY HAD THE MOST AFFORDABLE PRICES

Bumble and bumble Curl Conscious Shampoo 2 oz.
Bumble and bumble Curl Conscious Shampoo is tender care for delicate hair.
List Price: $13.99

Curly Hair Solutions Treatment Shampoo 8 oz.
Curly Hair Solutions Treatment Shampoo is a concentrate of panthenol and magnesium that strengthens the hair’s elasticity (the ability for the hair to stretch without breaking).
List Price: $16.99

Loreal Serie Expert Shine Curl Shampoo 8.45 oz.
Loreal Serie Expert Shine Curl Shampoo is a curl enhancing shampoo that helps to define your curls and gives your hair superior shine. Using reshaping agents this shampoo leaves your hair with lively, perfectly formed curls.
List Price: $20.99

Kerastase Bain Elasto-Curl Shampoo 8.5 oz.
Kerastase Bain Elasto-Curl shampoo is a hydra-toning shampoo for dry, curly hair.
List Price: $32.95

Bumble and bumble Curl Conscious Shampoo 33.8 oz.
Bumble and bumble Curl Conscious Shampoo is tender care for delicate hair.
List Price: $79.95

Alterna Life Curls Shampoo 12 oz.
Alterna Life Curls Shampoo gently cleanses while fortifying dry, damaged hair. Contains UV protectants and safe for chemically treated hair.
List Price: $24.95

Curly Hair Solutions Silk Shampoo 8 oz.
Curly Hair Solutions Silk Shampoo is a rich moisturizing shampoo with pure silk protein.
List Price: $16.99

ABBA True Curls Shampoo 10 oz.
ABBA True Curls Shampoo utilizes a cocktail of herbal extracts to restore manageability, build body and add bounce to curly or wavy hair.
List Price: $15.99

Curly Hair Solutions Treatment Shampoo 8 oz.
Curly Hair Solutions Treatment Shampoo is a concentrate of panthenol and magnesium that strengthens the hair’s elasticity (the ability for the hair to stretch without breaking).
List Price: $16.99

Bumble and bumble Curl Conscious Conditioner 2 oz.
Bumble and bumble Curl Conscious Conditioner is a ground-breaking formula that conditions and softens your curls.
List Price: $13.99

Bumble and bumble Curl Conscious Shampoo 2 oz.
Bumble and bumble Curl Conscious Shampoo is tender care for delicate hair.
List Price: $13.99

Bumble and bumble Curl Conscious Shampoo 33.8 oz.
Bumble and bumble Curl Conscious Shampoo is tender care for delicate hair.
List Price: $79.95

TIGI Catwalk Curls Rock Curly Hair Shampoo
Tigi Catwalk Curls Rock Curly Hair Shampoo – The ultimate in curly hair shampoos that helps hair to separate, define, defrizz and keeps curly hair looking its best. After shampooing with Curls Rock Curly Hair Shampoo use Curls Rock Hair Conditioner fox maximum effecet!
List Price: $10.95

Hair Light Vitalizing Shampoo
Hair Light Vitalizing Shampoo is enriched with sea plants extracts, this vitalizing shampoo restores micro-circulation to the scalp, resulting in excellent condition, reinforcing weak hair, and preventing hair loss.
List Price: $11.16

Jason Damage Control Creme Shampoo
This unique formula in a French Seaweed base is a protein enriched shampoo designed to gently cleanse color-treated or damaged hair, restoring its natural luster, resilience and softness.
List Price: $14.95

ApHOGEE Shampoo for Damaged Hair
ApHOGEE products are scientifically formulated using the highest quality ingredients, to restore seriously damaged hair to healthy condition.
List Price: $6.95

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African black soap, also referred to as black soap, is made from harvested and air-dried plantain skins, palm leaves, cocoa pod powder, and various oils and butters; coconut oil, Shea butter, cocoa butter and kernel oil. The plants used in black soap are dried in the sun and roasted in clay ovens to produce ash. The ash is added o water and filtered to produce African black soap. The roasting process produces a deep, dark brown color with black specs throughout, hence the name African black soap. African black soap is rich in naturally occurring vitamins E and A and antioxidants.

African black soap can be applied to the hair as a gentle cleanser; it contains no sodium lauryl sulfate, a lathering agent that strips the hair of its natural oils.

African black soap can be used to treat and prevent dandruff; the anti-fungal and anti-bacterial properties contained in African black soap are beneficial for prohibiting bacterial growth on the scalp and relieving minor scalp irritation. If you are experiencing excessive dandruff or itching of the scalp, please contact a trichologist, a professional skilled in treating scalp disorders.

African black soap can be converted into a liquid form when it is added to water for several hours. Add small pieces of the African black soap to a disposable container; cover them with water and leave them overnight. You can use the liquid form as you would the solid form


How to properly cleanse afro textured hair

Did you know that the only thing that can really moisturize your hair is water? All the serums, oils and conditioners in the world can’t take its place. All they do is help seal in the moisture that water puts into your hair. There is a myth going around that black women should not wash their hair because it will dry out. This is absolutely not true. Don’t be afraid to wash your hair because it won’t fall out or break off. In fact your hair is screaming for moisture, and generally the more you give it the better it is. Your hair is very delicate, so use the gentlest shampoo available that meets your hair’s needs. Use it sparingly because for black hair squeaky clean isn’t a good thing.

1. Gently detangle your hair with a wide tooth comb.
2. Saturate your hair with water with before you apply the shampoo.
3. Use a dime or quarter-sized amount of shampoo depending on your hair’s length. Work it into lather. Concentrate on your scrubbing your scalp.
Remember, shampoo is for the scalp and conditioner is for the hair.
4. Massage your scalp deeply to invigorate it and loosen flakes that might be there.
5. Thoroughly rinse your hair till all traces of shampoo are gone. This should take about 1 and a half to 2 minutes. Part your hair and check to make sure it’s all out.
6. Gently squeeze the water out of your hair.
NOTE: When I wash my hair it is usually in the shower. I do it in the shower because the steam opens the cuticles and allows for a deeper wash and condition. I always part it into four sections because it is easier to wash for me so I twist each section so they are out of the way before I enter the shower. I apply shampoo to one section at a time. I do this by working the shampoo into my scalp first them running my hand down the shaft of my hair, rinsing at the same time. I do this because my hair easily tangles. Plus, running my hands down the shaft prevents splits in my hair. After I have shampooed one section twice, I apply conditioner the same way. Then twist it up and move on to the next section. It takes about 5 minutes per section so after I am all finished the conditioner will have been in each section about 20 minutes. I untwist all my hair and rinse in cool water about 5 minutes to close my cuticle. Rinsing in cool water also traps in the moisture from the conditioner.


African black soap, also referred to as black soap, is made from harvested and air-dried plantain skins, palm leaves, cocoa pod powder, and various oils and butters; coconut oil, Shea butter, cocoa butter and kernel oil. The plants used in black soap are dried in the sun and roasted in clay ovens to produce ash. The ash is added o water and filtered to produce African black soap. The roasting process produces a deep, dark brown color with black specs throughout, hence the name African black soap. African black soap is rich in naturally occurring vitamins E and A and antioxidants.

Black soap is available even in America but the authentic kind is made mostly in Western Africa. African Black Soap is a soap made mainly in Ghana. Ghana, or The Republic of Ghana, is a country located in West Africa. The difference in the soap quality lies in the preparation itself. The genuine product is made by first burning leaves and barks of a variety of tress and includes banana tree leaves, plantain skins, palm tree leaves and cocoa pods among others in a big vat. The ash residue is then mixed with water and filtered out. To this mixture, ingredients like coconut, palm and palm kernel oils, shea butter and cocoa butter are added to make the soap. Women actually hand stir the concoction for an entire day and then the soap is set out for curing for a period of 14 days approximately.

The soap is comprised of the ashes from burned cocoa bean pods and plantain peels, palm oil and shea butter. It is unlike any other soap in the world because it is free of lye. Lye, also known as potassium hydroxide, is used in soaps, and has been known to cause irritations to the skin.

African black soap recipes are handed down from generation to generation, and you will find that each region has its own unique recipe for making the soap. For example soap made in the coastal areas has a higher percentage of coconut oil but soap made in the interior regions will have more shea butter.

Black soap is often referred to by a variety of names. One of the most common is Ose Dudu; ose meaning soap and dudu black.

African black soap can be applied to the hair as a gentle cleanser; it contains no sodium lauryl sulfate, a lathering agent that strips the hair of its natural oils.

African black soap can be used to treat and prevent dandruff; the anti-fungal and anti-bacterial properties contained in African black soap are beneficial for prohibiting bacterial growth on the scalp and relieving minor scalp irritation. If you are experiencing excessive dandruff or itching of the scalp, please contact a trichologist, a professional skilled in treating scalp disorders.

African black soap can be converted into a liquid form when it is added to water for several hours. Add small pieces of the African black soap to a disposable container; cover them with water and leave them overnight. You can use the liquid form as you would the solid form.


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