Faith Amour Hair Care

Argan Moroccan Oil

Posted on: March 17, 2011


Moroccan Argan Oil
Found on http://www.moroccanoil.com/

Moroccan oil is an oil treatment for all hair types. Moroccan Oil is alcohol-free and has a patented weightless formula with no build up. Softens thick unmanageable hair and restores shine and softness to dull lifeless hair. Instantly absorbed into the hair, this trademarked product eliminates frizz, speeds up styling time by 40%, and provides long-term conditioning to all hair types. Moroccan Oil contains a unique formula that strengthens brittle hair while promoting healing to the hair. Also provides nourishment to hair damaged by coloring and styling. Creates an optimal balance for the hair and scalp. Moroccan oil nourishes the scalp by alleviating itchy, dry scalps. Protects against UV damage and other environmental factors. Reduces drying time.

Although Moroccan oil is an oil treatment, it will not make your hair oily. Since healthy hair needs a fine balance of natural oils and vitamins, Moroccan Oil provides these much needed nutrients to make hair smoother and easier to manage without making the hair oily. Massaging a few drops of this oil into the hair just after shampooing and conditioning will guarantee an enhanced result… hair looks shinier and healthier after just one application. With multiple applications hair continues to improve – alleviating split ends and brittle breakage – without any oily residue!

Moroccan oil is also a great product for people who color their hair.
(1) It can be used directly on the hair before the color is applied
(2) It can be mixed with the color products and then applied to the hair
(3) It can be used as a conditioner after the entire color process has been completed.

• The benefits to this include: increased manageability, less frizz, enhanced color and color that lasts longer, increased elasticity, and great shine!

The quantity of Moroccan Oil needed depends on the texture and volume of the hair: Highlighted hair will need more rather than less Moroccan oil. Virgin or untreated hair needs the least amount of Moroccan oil– perhaps a dime shaped amount rubbed into the palms and then through the hair.

Mixing Moroccan Oil with Color Applications: Moroccan Oil can be mixed with haircolor, highlights, straightening, and perms. For long hair, it is suggested to use 10ml of Moroccan oil into the mix. Before applying the color mix, apply 5 ml. of Moroccan oil and massage it through hair. As always, the quantity used depends on the thickness of the hair. It is always suggested to use less since you can always add more product to the mix if you need to. Please note that Moroccan Oil is added as a final procedure, after the mix has been prepared.

About Moroccan Oil: Moroccan oil has the unique quality of instant absorption into hair, creating an instant shine without leaving an oily residue. Moroccan oil products contains a special, ultra light, non-greasy formula that seals in shine producing silky perfection for all hair types. Moroccan oil™ combines traditional methods with contemporary needs and technology. It revitalizes hair and brings new opportunities to stylists and salons.

For centuries Argan oil has traditionally been used by women in Morocco to treat hair and nails in order to counteract the effects of the hot climate and aging. The Argan tree only grows in an area of South West Morocco called Argana. It flourishes in the desert-like conditions and produces lush fruits much like olives yet larger and rounder. Inside the fruit grows a large nut that houses up to three almond-shape kernels which are the source of the miraculous oil. Just as the Argan tree grows deep into the mountainous hills of Morocco insearch of water, so too does Moroccan oil seep into hairs’ roots, providing unparalleled shine, enhanced long-term conditioning effects, and efficient protection against the longterm effects of environmental and chemical pollutants. Argan oil contains unsaturated fatty acids and is rich in tocopherols which works like vitamin E (nature’s most powerful antioxidant agent). Argan oil naturally renews cell structure and always consistently restores shine to dull lifeless hair!

Argan oil is an oil produced from the kernels of the argan tree, endemic to Morocco, that is valued for its nutritive, cosmetic and numerous medicinal properties. The tree, a relict species from the Tertiary age, is extremely well adapted to drought and other environmentally difficult conditions of southwestern Morocco. The species Argania once covered North Africa and is now endangered and under protection of UNESCO.[1] The Argan tree grows wild in semi-desert soil, its deep root system helping to protect against soil erosion and the northern advance of the Sahara.[2] This biosphere reserve, the Arganeraie Biosphere Reserve, covers a vast intramontane plain of more than 2,560,000 hectares, bordered by the High Atlas and Anti-Atlas Mountains and open to the Atlantic in the west. Argan oil remains one of the rarest oils in the world due the small and very specific growing areas.

Argan trees were first reported by the explorer Leo Africanus in 1510. An early specimen was taken to Amsterdam where it was cultivated by Lady Beaufort at Badminton House in 1711.For modern times, the Berbers (indigenous people of Morocco) of this area would collect undigested argan pits from the waste of goats which climb the trees to eat their fruit. The pits were then ground and pressed to make the nutty oil used in cooking and cosmetics. However, the oil used in cosmetic and culinary products available for sale today has most likely been harvested and processed with machines in a verifiably clean and sanitary way.

The oil was sold in Moroccan markets even before the Phoenicians arrived, yet the hardy argan tree has been slowly disappearing. Overgrazing by goats and a growing, wood-hungry local population have whittled the number of surviving trees down to less than half of what it was 50 years ago.

The tree is a relic of the Earth’s Tertiary Period, which ended about 1.6 million years ago, and it grows in only a few other places in the world. It is tenacious, withering and fruitless during extended droughts, and it lives as long as 200 years. So there was alarm that the Argania spinosa, as the tree is properly called, was headed for extinction, along with its precious goat-related oil.

UNESCO, and enthusiasts excited by the oil’s reputed anti-aging qualities have helped by creating a global market for the exotic oil, the unlikely alliance hopes to raise awareness about the inherent value of the trees, encouraging more careful grazing and stopping the local population from chopping the trees down for firewood. The people in the area are poor; as they now understand the value of the tree, they are protecting it.

UNESCO declared a 25,900-square-kilometer of land between the Atlantic and the Atlas Mountains a reserve and provided money to manage the trees’ preservation. Chefs and society matrons took up the cause, praising the culinary qualities of the oil and its anti-aging effect on the skin. There is also a ban against grazing in the trees from May to August, when the fruit ripens to a bright yellow and eventually the goats climb the trees, eat the fruit and expel the pits, which locals continue to collect.

At the Cooperative in Tiout, Berber women sit on the floor with rough rectangular stones between their knees cracking pits with rounded rocks. Each smooth pit contains one to three kernels, which look like sliced almonds and are rich in oil. The kernels are then removed and gently roasted. This roasting accounts for part of the oil’s distinctive, nutty flavour. It takes several days and about 32 kilograms of fruit – roughly one season’s produce from a single tree – to make only one liter of oil. The cosmetic oil, rich in vitamin E and essential fatty acids, is used for massage, facials and as an ingredient in anti-aging cream. The edible oil is extracted from roasted kernels.

Most of the oil is bottled pure for cooking, as a dressing on salads, meat or fish or simply as a dip for bread. The Tiout cooperative produces about 5,000 250-milliliter bottles of the edible oil a year. The oil can be purchased at the Cooperative in Tiout but the neighbouring city of Agadir sells the oil for a fair price as well.

Press-extraction
Now increasingly important for oil produced for sale, as the oil will keep 12–18 months and extraction is much faster. Using mechanical presses, mixing of the dough and water is unnecessary and the dough can be directly pressed. All other steps remaining unchanged, the oil is obtained in about 43% yield (calculated from the kernels) and only two hours are needed to get one litre of oil that preserves correctly.

Solvent-extraction
For industrial or laboratory purposes, argan oil can be extracted from ground kernels using any volatile lipophilic solvent. After evaporation of this latter, and one or two cycles of extraction, the oil is obtained in 50 to 55% yield. This type of extraction furnishes an oil with unsatisfactory organoleptic properties compared to the traditional or press extraction, which is exclusively reserved to prepare argan oil for cosmetic purposes.

Argan oil is exceptionally rich in natural tocopherols (vitamin E), rich in phenols and phenolic acid, rich in carotenes, rich in squalene, rich in essential fatty acids, 80% unsaturated fatty acids[3][unreliable source?] and depending on extraction method more resistant to oxidation than olive oil.

Argan oil is used for dipping bread, on couscous, salads and similar uses. “Amlou” a thick brown paste with a consistency similar to peanut butter is produced by stone grinding roasted almond and Argan oil and is considered a favorite local bread dip. The unroasted oil is traditionally used as a treatment for skin diseases, and has found favour with the cosmetics industry.

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